Archive for the ‘LATEST NEWS’ Category

THIS BETTER BE TRUE…LOL AND NONE OF THAT TRAP CRAP EITHER!!!!

 

MTV is bringing back its iconic Hip Hop show “YO! MTV Raps”According to AllHipHop.com, the network is planning a reboot of the show, however the information is sketchy at this time. MTV also announced earlier this year they would be bringing back more of your favourite 90’s shows in the form of a new channel called “MTV Classic”.

The show, which ran from 1988 to ,was hugely successful and elevated many rappers careers.

“YO! MTV Raps” set the mould for other rap based shows including inspiring BET to start “Rap City” the following year.

No ideas or hints have been said on who will step up to the momentous task and present the new show. The original format saw various hosts including Fab 5 Freddie, Ed Lover and Dr. Dre.

With such a big name to uphold, should it just be left as a classic or is a reboot a good idea?

 

Gene Wilder Dead

August 29, 2016
 

Gene Wilder, who regularly stole the show in such comedic gems as “The Producers,” “Blazing Saddles,” “Young Frankenstein,” “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory” and “Stir Crazy,” died Monday at his home in Stamford, Conn. His nephew Jordan Walker-Pearlman said he died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease. He was 83.

His nephew said in a statement, “We understand for all the emotional and physical challenges this situation presented we have been among the lucky ones — this illness-pirate, unlike in so many cases, never stole his ability to recognize those that were closest to him, nor took command of his central-gentle-life affirming core personality. The decision to wait until this time to disclose his condition wasn’t vanity, but more so that the countless young children that would smile or call out to him “there’s Willy Wonka,” would not have to be then exposed to an adult referencing illness or trouble and causing delight to travel to worry, disappointment or confusion. He simply couldn’t bear the idea of one less smile in the world.

He continued to enjoy art, music, and kissing with his leading lady of the last twenty-five years, Karen. He danced down a church aisle at a wedding as parent of the groom and ring bearer, held countless afternoon movie western marathons and delighted in the the company of beloved ones.”

Related

Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory

Celebrities React to Gene Wilder’s Death

He had been diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in 1989.

The comic actor, who was twice Oscar nominated, for his role in “The Producers” and for co-penning “Young Frankenstein” with Mel Brooks, usually portrayed a neurotic who veered between total hysteria and dewy-eyed tenderness. “My quiet exterior used to be a mask for hysteria,” he told Time magazine in 1970. “After seven years of analysis, it just became a habit.”

Habit or not, he got a great deal of mileage out of his persona in the 1970s for directors like Mel Brooks and Woody Allen, leading to a few less successful stints behind the camera, the best of which was “The Woman in Red,” co-starring then-wife Gilda Radner. Wilder was devastated by Radner’s death from ovarian cancer in 1989 and worked only intermittently after that. He tried his hand briefly at a sitcom in 1994, “Something Wilder,” and won an Emmy in 2003 for a guest role on “Will & Grace.”

His professional debut came in Off Broadway’s “Roots” in 1961, followed by a stint on Broadway in Graham Greene’s comedy “The Complaisant Lover,” which won him a Clarence Derwent Award as promising newcomer. His performance in the 1963 production of Brecht’s “Mother Courage” was seen by Mel Brooks, whose future wife, Anne Bancroft, was starring in the production; a friendship with Brooks would lead to some of Wilder’s most successful film work. For the time being, however, Wilder continued to work onstage, in “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” in 1963 and “Dynamite Tonight” and “The White House” the following year. He then understudied Alan Arkin and Gabriel Dell in “Luv,” eventually taking over the role.

Wilder also worked in television in 1962’s “The Sound of Hunting,” “The Interrogators,” “Windfall” and in the 1966 TV production of “Death of a Salesman” with Lee J. Cobb. He later starred in TV movies including “Thursday’s Game” and the comedy-variety special “Annie and the Hoods,” both in 1974.

In 1967 Wilder essayed his first memorable bigscreen neurotic, Eugene Grizzard, a kidnapped undertaker in Arthur Penn’s classic “Bonnie and Clyde.”

Then came “The Producers,” in which he played the hysterical Leo Bloom, an accountant lured into a money bilking scheme by a theatrical producer played by Zero Mostel. Directed and written by Brooks, the film brought Wilder an Oscar nomination as best supporting actor. With that, his film career was born.

He next starred in a dual role with Donald Sutherland in “Start the Revolution Without Me,” in which he displayed his fencing abilities. It was followed by another middling comedy, “Quackser Fortune Has a Cousin in the Bronx,” also in 1970.

In 1971 he stepped into the shoes of Willy Wonka, one of his most beloved and gentle characters. Based on the children’s book by Roald Dahl, “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory” was not an immediate hit but became a children’s favorite over the years. The same cannot be said for the 1974 Stanley Donen-directed musical version of “The Little Prince,” in which Wilder appeared as the fox. He had somewhat better luck in Woody Allen’s spoof “Everything You Wanted to Know About Sex,” appearing in a hilarious segment in which he played a doctor who falls in love with a sheep named Daisy.

Full-fledged film stardom came with two other Brooks comedies, both in 1974: Western spoof “Blazing Saddles” and a wacko adaptation of Mary Shelley’s famous book entitled “Young Frankenstein,” in which Wilder portrayed the mad scientist with his signature mixture of hysteria and sweetness.

Working with Brooks spurred Wilder to write and direct his own comedies, though none reached the heights of his collaborations with Brooks. The first of these was “The Adventure of Sherlock Holmes’ Smarter Brother” (1975), in which he included such Brooks regulars as Madeline Kahn and Marty Feldman. It was followed by 1977’s “The World’s Greatest Lover,” which he also produced.

Wilder fared better, however, when he was working solely in front of the camera, particularly in a number of films in which he co-starred with Richard Pryor.

The first of these was 1976’s “Silver Streak,” a spoof of film thrillers set on trains; 1980’s “Stir Crazy” was an even bigger hit, grossing more than $100 million. Wilder and Pryor’s two other pairings, “See No Evil, Hear No Evil” and “Another You,” provided diminishing returns, however.

While filming “Hanky Panky” in 1982, Wilder met “Saturday Night Live” comedienne Radner. She became his third wife shortly thereafter. Wilder and Radner co-starred in his most successful directing stint, “The Woman in Red” in 1984, and then “Haunted Honeymoon.” But Radner grew ill with cancer, and he devoted himself to her care, working sporadically after that and hardly at all after her death in 1989.

In the early ’90s he appeared in his last film with Pryor and another comedy, “Funny About Love.” In addition to the failed TV series “Something Wilder” in 1994, he wrote and starred in the A&E mystery telepics “The Lady in Question” and “Murder in a Small Town” in 1999. He also appeared as the Mock Turtle in a 1999 NBC adaptation of “Alice in Wonderland.”

He last acted in a couple of episodes of “Will and Grace” in 2002-03 as Mr. Stein, winning an Emmy.

He was born Jerome Silberman in Milwaukee and began studying acting at the age of 12. After getting his B.A. from the U. of Iowa in 1955, Wilder enrolled in the Old Vic Theater school in Bristol, where he learned acting technique and fencing. When he returned to the U.S. he taught fencing and did other odd jobs while studying with Herbert Berghof’s HB Studio and at the Actors Studio under Lee Strasberg.

Wilder’s memoir “Kiss Me Like a Stranger: My Search for Love and Art” was published in 2005. After that he wrote fiction: the 2007 novel “My French Whore”; 2008’s “The Woman Who Wouldn’t”; a collection of stories, “What Is This Thing Called Love?,” in 2010; and the novella “Something to Remember You By: A Perilous Romance” in 2013.

Wilder was interviewed by Alec Baldwin for the one-hour TCM documentary “Role Model: Gene Wilder” in 2008. The actor was also active in raising cancer awareness in the wake of Radner’s death.

He is survived by his fourth wife Karen Boyer, whom he married in 1991 and his nephew. His sister Corinne, predeceased him in January 2016.

 

1ST OFF I’D BAN RAP MUSIC TOO CAUSE IT SUCKS ASS!!!! LOL BUT NOT HIP HOP….JS BIG ROCK….DIRTY DOGGS

 

Portland Public Schools Accused Of Being Racist For Banning Rap Music

YouTube

Portland, OR – Several outraged parents lashed out at Portland Public Schools officials once they got a whiff of the policy put into place to silence all rap music on their children’s buses.

They allege it was a measure of racism, used to stifle music favorable to black people. It’s not exactly the type of stigma one wants to see attached in what is reportedly the whitest major city in the United States.

Back in March of this year, Teri Brady, senior director of transportation at Portland Public Schools, sent a memorandum to all bus drivers in the district, officially forbidding them to play “religious, rap music, or talk show programs” while practically deeming pop, country and jazz stations God’s gift to sound.

A copy of the memo only begun to circulate parents’ radar this week and it immediately spelled controversy for the school board.

“I think it’s overtly racist and leaves out two of our major communities in our music choices,” said Colleen Ryan-Onken, a white parent, told The Oregonian.

Ryan-Onken also took great exception to the notion that Latin music was completely omitted from the conversation and country music was being classified as a safe choice for students.

“Country music is offensive. It’s about date rape, liquor and drugs — all kinds of things!” she exclaimed. “It’s just as offensive as rap music can be.”

Another white parent, Kim Sordyl, wrote a concerned letter to school board vice chairwoman Amy Kohnstamm, expressing how she too, felt the rap music ban was racist.

“PPS has a spent a lot of taxpayer dollars on a PR show of equity. It has a ‘Racial Equity Policy,’ ‘equity lens’ table tents & posters, $9 million/year is spent on no-bid equity contractors (who donated to your campaign),” she wrote.

Backlash typically breeds buckling and The Oregonian reported yesterday (August 25) that the school board was going back to the drawing board on its playlist options.

“We regret the way this was communicated. Our intent is to limit student exposure to religious teachings, profanity and violent lyrics,” Portland Public Schools spokeswoman Courtney Westling said, citing that her district had been privy to several complaints. “The transportation department will be revising its guidance to bus drivers shortly to be more inclusive of different genres of music.”

In the legendary words of the honorable Marshall Bruce Mathers III, “Get aware, wake up, get a sense of humor/Quit tryin’ to censor music, this is for your kid’s amusement.”

The cultural icon who has quite possibly the most impressive résumé in music today is adding another job to the list: internet radio host. Questlove (born Ahmir Thompson), founding member of the Legendary Roots Crew, NYU professor, “Tonight Show” bandleader, New York Times bestselling author, international DJ, Grammy winner, “Hamilton” producer, and occasional actor has found the time to enter the streaming-entertainment market alongside Pandora, the music-streaming service which debuted over a decade ago, in 2005. The partnership has been in the making for a while, but today (August 24), it culminates with the announcement of “Questlove Supreme.”

questlove supreme

Launching on September 7 at 1pm EST, Questo’s new program is described by the New York Times as a weekly “three-hour program with wide-ranging playlists and guests” which ” shows off its host’s eclectic tastes.” Thompson himself describes it as “the Black nerd version of NPR” and an unofficial extension of his New York University courses. The marriage of Thompson and Pandora is, in part, an effort to “compete directly with Spotify, Apple Music and Tidal,” as reported by the Times’ Ben Sisario. It’s a major offensive move by the internet-radio juggernaut who at times has “has clashed with the music industry in the past.” By merging creative forces with Quest, Pandora has aligned itself with one of the most beloved figures in pop culture.

It’s a major win for music fans, too (not the mention Hip-Hop Heads and Roots fans). While icons like Q-Tip and Sway have used internet radio to host conversations that go beyond music, Questlove’s show will be following a unique format. Firstly, it will be three-hours long, giving whatever music is played and whatever discussion is inspired a chance to breathe. Context will likely be a major player on “Questlove Supreme,” where the history of songs and their creators will be given the kind of encyclopedic attention Thompson is known for. Secondly, the music featured each week will be inspired by the topics discussed and not the other way around (which is by and large the formula for most shows of this nature). Questlove will be matching the thematic elements of any given week’s topic by including songs that help illustrate the concepts at hand, a process that will likely become as inventive a history lesson as the “Hamilton” Broadway play in which he is so heavily involved.

The show has been described as “a weekly ride through the global musical landscape featuring adventurous music selections, compelling conversations and revealing interviews with music lovers from the entertainment industry and beyond,” and there is no better guide for such a ride than the man with such a diverse list of accomplishments. Heads will have interviews with the likes of Bob Power to look forward to. The selection of the veteran sound man (whose work on seminal classics like A Tribe Called Quest’s The Low End Theory has made him a legend) as an inaugural guest is indicative of the exceptional curation and thought that will go into to each and every episode. Questlove himself has made it known that to prepare for each installment, he listens to over 200 songs. And it’s that kind of unbounded dedication that makes him an exemplary choice to steer Pandora in its next direction. “Pandora is a company born of a musician’s experience” with a “deep respect for the craft of music and a commitment to the musicians that make it their living,” says Quest.

From The Roots To ‘Roots’: Questlove To Handle Music For Alex Haley Remake

The company’s co-founder, Tim Westergren, described the partnership with Quest as being emblematic of the fact that Pandora is “entering into a new phase” in which they “are working more directly with labels and artists.” As such, Westergren said of the partnership with Thompson, “having someone like him bridge that and speak on our behalf is really powerful.” But the relationship is far from one-sided. After all, Pandora “has long been the most popular internet radio service, and it is one of a handful of digital music brands that have become household names,” writes Sisario. However, the company hasn’t increased its peak number of average monthly listeners since 2014, when 81.5 million people tuned in.

To address such concerns, Pandora “plans to introduce a multitiered new service that, in addition to its basic radio version, will add levels of on-demand access — the ability for customers to listen to any song they want — for prices of up to $10 a month.” “Questlove Supreme” is an introductory offering into that type of dynamic content. On his first episode, longtime friend and superstar comedian Maya Rudolph will join Thompson (as will Power). The inaugural installment will be the first chapter in what he describes as “a commitment deeper than any girlfriend I’ve ever had.” But his show is just one facet of his partnership with Pandora. Unsurprisingly, the endlessly affable personality is also functioning as an ambassador, a duty which involves his “evangelizing for the service among fellow artists.”

queslove

This is an identifying facet that could prove to be Pandora’s secret weapon. “Pandora is eager to promote the marketing platforms it makes available to artists, such as audio messages that can be delivered to fans and detailed data about the popularity of particular songs,” reports Sisario.

Questlove Goes On A Quest For Musical Culture In Cuba (Video)

For Heads already counting down the days until September 7, Questlove offered up a glimpse of his artistic vision for the show. “I want a world in which Drake’s ‘One Dance’ can also live with Frank Zappa’s Uncle Meat can live with James Brown’s ‘Talkin’ Loud and Sayin’ Nothing.’” For even more of an introduction, check out this celebratory mix created by the man himself.

ITS ABOUT TO GET REAL IN THE FIELD CATS BETTER STEP THERE BARS UP YO…BIG ROCK

I MIGHT HAVE TO GET IN ON THIS ONE….LOL DIRTY DOGGS 4 LIFE BABY!!!!

Mobb Deep Issues #ShookOnesChallenge For All The Hundred Dollar Billas

Instagram/Mobb Deep –

 

QBC – Chance The Rapper’s ingenious #SoGoneChallenge has likely run its course, but not without making as big a cultural impact one can have through social media hashtags.

Sports stars such as Dame Lillard, Dwyane Wade and Rasheed Wallace, as well as other celebrities like Kevin Hart, Keke Palmer and even the song’s originator, R&B songstress Monica all followed the trend that kept us entertained for about week.

But a couple of legendary rappers from the Queensbridge projects are saying it’s time for the realll…Hip Hop, and they have just the instrumental to command a real MC’s attention.

Less than 24 hours ago, The Infamous Mobb Deep sent out the call for the #ShookOnesChallenge, which utilizes their classic 1995 single “Shook Ones (Pt. II)” from their classic “debut,” The Infamous. Although the record isn’t renown for its commercial prowess or award show trophies, it’s widely respected as one of the greatest Hip Hop songs of all-time, even getting a second resurgence for a new generation by appearing in the most important scene of Eminem’s 2002 8 Mile film, as well as its secondary soundtrack, More Music from 8 Mile.

“No disrespect to those doing the #SoGoneChallenge but we want to know where the real spitters at?” the official Mobb Deep Instagram page wrote. Prodigy made the call so it’s on #ShookOnesChallenge let’s go! No whack Ish allowed… #InfamousSociety #IceExports #MobbDeep”

 

50 Cent Gets Big Meech Blessing For B.M.F. TV Series

50 Cent is going to keep flexing with an official Big Meech blessing for his latest endeavor, a TV series sharing the story of the B.M.F. drug empire.

The rap mogul shared a handwritten letter from the B.M.F. leader to his Instagram page with the caption, “Read carefully, I’m not playing no games. BMF COMING SOON!!!#EFFENVODKA #FRIGO.”

In the note, Big Meech, born Demetrius Flenory, gives his blessing for 50 Cent and Randall Emmett to produce the show, which is slated to appear on Starz, the same network that hosts “Power.” The leader cites the success of the record-breaking show as one reason he trusts them with their latest venture.

“I feel that the two of you are the perfect team to tell ‘my story,’” he says.

He continues that he has not approved of any other attempt to tell the B.M.F. narrative and that it would be impossible for anyone to paint the complete picture without his co-sign.

“I’m the only one that can tell the B.M.F. & Big Meech story,” he says, “so any person or persons trying to do a film is ‘100% faking.’ ‘Loyalty’ is not just a word it’s a ‘lifestyle.’ ‘Death b4 dishonor.’”

B.M.F. established itself through a cocaine empire in the 1990s that stretched from Los Angeles to Atlanta. The B.M.F. brand spawned a record label, B.M.F. Entertainment, which worked with Jay Z, Jeezy and others. Big Meech and other execs, including his brother “Southwest T” Flenory, were arrested in 2005. The brothers are now serving 30-year prison sentences.

 

See the entire letter of 50 Cent getting Big Meech’s blessing for the B.M.F. project below.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BJb8UBlAhzp/embed/captioned/?v=7https://www.instagram.com/p/BJb9CixA6nk/embed/captioned/?v=7https://www.instagram.com/p/BJQDgfKAmz0/embed/captioned/?v=7

by Victoria Hernandez

Action Bronson's El Gran Combo Lawsuit Dismissed

Good news for one rapper this morning as Action Bronson’s El Gran Combo lawsuit has been dismissed, according to theJasmineBRAND.com.

Music publishing companies Cartagena Enterprises and Rico Records filed paperwork August 17 to have the case dismissed. Bronson’s legal team signed off on the documents, implying that the parties reached some sort of settlement.

The companies took Action Bronson to court a year ago, claiming he sampled two El Gran Combo songs without getting clearance: “Falsaria” for “Mofongo” and “Trampolin” on “Tapas.” They said proof of his knowledge of using the group’s work came in a 2011 Twitter post where he comments about “Falsaria” and a 2014 interview where he says he listens to El Gran Combo while cooking.

Bronson fired back after the initial lawsuit was filed, saying that the companies did not own the rights to the music in question and that according to the statute of limitations, they waited too long to bring their case to court.

Well, the New York MC can focus on rapping and cooking and acting jolly as the El Gran Combo lawsuit has been dismissed. Watch his “Fuck That’s Delicious” show on Viceland.

Season 2 of the show is expected soon.

by Trent Clark

Here's How Hawaiian Rapper Prizzy Prie Is Making A Change At Home
Melanie Shih-Lan Tjoeng

Few people would expect a tourist hotbed such as Hawaii to be the target of political protests but make no mistake: there are those individuals who will never let the lavish vacation settings of palm trees cloudless skies distort their own reality as to what’s actually going on in the world.

The consecutive deaths of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile at the hands of law enforcement sent shockwaves across the entire country and the city of Honolulu was no exception, thanks to the studious efforts of local rap sensation Prizzy Prie and a handful of others with their March For Peace initiative.

On July 11, I just happened to be in the heart of said tourist hotbed in the area of Waikiki when I saw roughly 50 protestors marching up the street; stoic visual reminders to anyone who had slunk away to the regions of utopia figuring that the world wasn’t as sunny as their vacation allowed them to believe. Some onlookers expressed immediately shock while others tried their best to ignore it in hopes that the moment would soon pass. As I sat in the most convenient of stalwart traffic, a lesbian couple broke their hand embrace to enthusiastically cheer them on from across the street. The march was a success.

As I came to find out, it was Prie who had organized the protest, who he says is boosted by the reggae/Hip Hop drummers The Late Ones, for they are an invaluable asset when it comes to coordinating sponsors and create ideas.

The success has not only transcended to a second march recently being announced for the month of September, the mayor of Honolulu, Kirk Caldwell, has also put his support behind the movement.

While shooting a segment for the upcoming television episode of mydiveoLive with Roslynn Cobarrubias, I sat down with Prie to gauge his thoughts on speaking out on injustice all the way from Hawaii.

And just in case you were wondering, his bars match the intensity of his thoughts. He recently was unofficially crowned the winner for our impromptu #DXLive artist submission segment.

A versatile lyrical delivery. Social commentary. Action outside of the booth. This is what being a great MC is all about, right?

HipHopDX: So what propelled you to organize this protest?

Prizzy Prie: Just to open critical dialogue and bring people together through communities with positive ideals and to help inspire the adults and the youth to come together.

DX: How did you organize it? Was it through social media or did you just get in the streets and recruit people?

prizzy prie

Photo: Melanie Shih-Lan Tjoeng

The police were amazing, they were definitely cooperative and they were there to make sure that everybody was safe. After that, we actually all got together and had food and drinks with the police. They were awesome, they are local brothers and they know [the deal].

Prizzy Prie: I put together the flyer and I had this idea and just told my friends that I see so many people on social media just pouring out their feelings but not enough people taking action.

DX: This is after the Dallas shooting?

Prizzy Prie: Yeah. So I don’t really like to go on social media because of that, but that’s what I’ve seen. And I figured every time we walk out the door people’s perception changed off of what they see from social media whether that’s positive or negative, but a lot of that is negative because it’s based off of world media and what they promote. So me and my friends were all just like we have to bring people together from all backgrounds and just open this critical dialogue that’s needed and let’s get together, let’s bring some ideals together. We can bring people of different cultural backgrounds together and unite communities and take a stand against all this negativity and the smoke screen that they try to put to divide people.

DX: Being from Hawaii, it seems like there might be a disconnect. It seems like you guys don’t have anything to worry about because it’s like a vacation town — maybe outside of a volcano erupting — but what were people in the community saying following Dallas and Alton Sterling and Philando Castile?

Prizzy Prie: They were saying a lot, they were expressing their feelings,

DX: And this is black and white people?

Prizzy Prie: This is all, this is a melting pot, but what people don’t realize is there’s a lot of struggle here. There’s a lot of oppression, there’s a lot of discrimination definitely gentrification where the Hawaii homestead people are getting ran off because of the prices of millionaires coming and buying up the land and upping the price of living so people can barely live. How I know is because I live in the public housing and my grandmother has been living in Kalihi for 40+ years and been helping give back to Kalihi and I see so many different people and different cultures come in and out. And what’s affecting it is black folks, Polynesians, Micronesians that recently got their island bombed and the U.S. was to blame for that so they brought them here and now they’re putting them on 50-something years of paying for that because the kids all have radiation and stuff like that and are all deformed. So it’s crazy and for me, I was lucky enough to get the best of both worlds.

Prie’s video for his #DXLive-stealing song, “The Life & A Day of a Madd Nigga.”Being raised in Vegas and being around the gang violence and then coming back here, and then seeing a whole different thing where everybody else is just as much as affected. That’s what gave me the idea to put this together and to see the responses from the people that didn’t know that were fighting for Alton Sterling and all that, they were like wow this is crazy I had no idea that this was going on here because I thought this was all palm trees, plastic cups, and sunny. They only promote that just to attract tourism but there’s seriously so much going on.

DX: How far did you guys travel the day of the protests?

Prizzy Prie: Straight from Ala Moana Beach Park [in Oahu] to the world famous Waikiki Strip. We wanted to make a bold statement with all the people there, even the people that forgot and had slept on the idea of raising awareness and being a voice to bring people together because a lot of people doubt that by saying “you’re not going to do anything together.” But it’s way better than just sitting on a couch and venting your feelings and not doing anything about it. You’re getting in your feelings and not actually taking action and uniting different communities from all over the place and different backgrounds from all over the place and come together with positive ideas, find a solution, and make a move and not just sit on your butt behind a computer screen or scroll on your phone.

DX: What was the police presence like during the protests? It was a peaceful protest, right?

Prizzy Prie: Yeah, it was peace marching and social gathering. The police were amazing, they were definitely cooperative and they were there to make sure that everybody was safe. After that, we actually all got together and had food and drinks with the police. They were awesome, they are local brothers and they know. They wear the badge but they know and some aren’t even afraid and some are shocked that someone my age could even put this together.

DX: How old are you?

Prizzy Prie: I’m 24. So they were really shocked and were like, “Man, this is crazy.” and I was even shocked myself because people were telling me, “You’re like a young MLK.” And I was like “Woah, chill. I’m just here bring people together so we can get some ideas going and create this critical dialogue that needs to be amongst the people.”

DX: It’s interesting that you said that because I think that’s an issue that a lot of people have is that the police are not connected with their community, but out here it seems like it’s a little bit different story.

Prizzy Prie: Yeah, because they are families. And it’s the same thing up there, but they try to blur the line between the police and the people but with the police officers, that’s their family members so they’re basically fighting each other and the system has put that smoke screen to divide people like that. The police are the same people as your family and your neighbors but they fail to realize that and that’s why [the] Mainland and America is going through so much because they fail to see the bigger picture, but here you have no choice but to see it because we all live together.

It’s like one big community. And it’s the same thing for America but again they try to put that line across with police and citizens but they’ve got families too. They’re the same. So if that understanding is there, I think a lot of that conflict that they’re going through right now would be solved. Just like the same family members of the officers who arrested a lot of people at Mount Mauna Kea for building the telescope. Those same officers were arresting their own family members based off of what? A check? Just to pay their bills and to feed their family? But if that’s what comes into play and that’s the system and that’s the game we have been adjusted to play. Its all one big game at the end of the day whether people want to believe it or not but it definitely is.

For more of Prizzy Prie, like his official Facebook page and follow him on Twitter and SoundCloud.

 

Great to see Redman in the news. Earlier this year, Red and Meth announced their equity partnership with BlazeNow, a GPS app that will you find all the weed options in your area. Who doesn’t need that? Also, if you missed it, A3C announced this week that Red will be honored as part of the Atlanta festival’s tribute to 1996, an incredibly strong year in rap history. His gold-selling classic Muddy Waters was released that year and still holds tight to this day. All of this got me thinking. Redman might be the greatest rapper of all time. Let’s break it down…

In June of 1997, Wu-Tang Clan kicked the summer off at the top of the Hip-Hop class. Whereas 1993’s Enter The Wu-Tang (36 Chambers) just missed the Top 40 (to eventually reach platinum), its follow-up Wu-Tang Forever would debut at #1. A double album, the Loud/RCA Records release of the nine-man collective would eventually achieve four platinum plaques—despite its conviction to unconventional rhyming and production. Also by ’97, Clansmen such as Method Man and Ol’ Dirty Bastard had cemented solo stardom with hits of their own.

On the other hand, RZA, who was supplying lots of production to his swordsmen at that time, had not yet released a solo LP (though he branched into work with Prince Paul and Gravediggaz). Masta Killa, who was held to just a single verse on the ’93 jump-off, was still getting his name up, thanks to key features on LPs by Ghostface Killah, Raekwon, and GZA. U-God, who played a greater role in the debut LP, was also waiting for chance to let the “golden arms” shine.

So in 1997, part of the Clan and DJ Allah Mathematics hit Tim Westwood’s London, England studio to promote Wu-Tang Forever. Even as A-list artists, the Clan wanted to freestyle just like they had before the deal. RZA joined Mathematics behind the turntables for a set that lasted nearly one hour (52 minutes)—in freestyle, free-form radio that Westwood has just digitized. Some of these verses are straight off of the Wu double LP, and other projects. Other verses are clearly completely off the dome. Between the rhyming-intensive radio takeover, there are some jokes, antics, and even U-God’s hotel room stated for all the interested parties. For a group often called “raw,” this nearly 20 year-old relic shows how unchanged by success the Wu really was.

Wu-Tang Clan fans, here’s an 11 minute freestyle from Method Man, U-God & Masta Killa (Video)

For the first 20 minutes, the MCs play round-robin with the mic over some classic breakbeats. Even though he’s on the decks for part of it (and tries to play a cassette of some beats later on), RZA grabs the microphone and gets his rhymes in too. Heads will hear 1970s and 1980s park-jam records like ESG’s “U.F.O.,” Melvin Bliss’ “Synthetic Substitution,” Billy Squier’s “Big Beat,” and The Honeydrippers’ “Impeach The President.” Some of these records have been the sample basis for Wu favorites. Here, they are presented in loops. After this part of the set, the sounds move to Wu-Tang Forever instrumentals, and other gems from the solo releases.

O.D.B. Put The “Free” In Freestyle In This 1995 Outburst (Audio)

This is the second straight week that Westwood unveiled his Thursday throwbacks with Method Man material. As a reminder, if there is another album coming by the Clan, Ghostface Killah is said to be the one at the helm in terms of sound and direction.

RZA Freestyles Out Of The Blue During An Interview, Talks Battling Inspectah Deck (Video)

This 1997 footage begs the question: How many MCs with a #1 album about to drop want to rock for this long?